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Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 1/6/2019

If you have just purchased a home, you have the option to refinance your home soon. Just because you can refinance your home doesnít mean that you should. How long you should wait to refinance your home depends on a few things including:


  • Your refinancing goals
  • The rules of your lender
  • If your mortgage has a pre-payment penalty clause

Goals


Your goals for refinancing are among the most important things when considering whether to refinance. Lenders typically wonít refinance a loan that you have secured in the last 120-180 days, so if youíre looking to lower your monthly payments, you may have to shop for a new lender.    


The Type Of Loan You Have


If your financial situation has changed, it may be smart to change the type of loan that you have. Oftentimes, changing the rate and the terms of the loan can give you the extra freedom that you need for your loan and your life. 


Pay Off Your Mortgage Faster


If you do a cash-in refinance, this could be a smart way for you to build equity for your financial future and help you to secure a lower rate for your mortgage. Keep in mind that FHA loans are a bit different when it comes to paying down your mortgage. The FHA streamline program requires that you wait a minimum of 6 months before you refinance. 


Pre-payment Penalties


 Before you refinance your home, youíll need to double-check to ensure that your mortgage doesnít have a pre-payment penalty. If you do have one of these clauses included in your loan agreement, you should consult your lender to make sure that refinancing is a smart move for you.


Lenderís Rules


Every lender has different rules as to how quickly you can refinance your mortgage. You may also need to meet certain qualifications in order to go ahead with the refinancing. 


As tempting as it can be to try and get a lower mortgage rate, you may want to hold off on refinancing for a variety of reasons. Remember that every time you refinance your home, youíll need to pay closing costs and other fees. While it may be a savings in the long term, it could cost you some up front cash. 


The best course of action is ideally to shop for  a lender and a mortgage rate that will suit your needs from the beginning. While no one can completely predict a changing market, you can shop around and find the right rate and loan for you at the time.




Tags: refinancing  
Categories: finances  


Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 4/8/2018

You know when you buy a home that your credit score matters, but do you see all of the numbers that matter to your financial picture when youíre buying a home? Your debt-to-income ratio is one of the most critical figures that will influence if you can get a mortgage and what type of rate you can get. 


What Is A Debt-To-Income Ratio?


This number is exactly what it states: the ratio of debt divided by your gross monthly income. Your credit report doesn't include any of this income information. This number is actually the best way to see if youíre living within your means or not. This way, your lender will know your monthly debt payments along with your monthly income.  


If your ratio of debt is high, you may not get a loan or get less desirable interest rates than if you had lower amounts of debt. Even if you have a high credit score, your debt-to-income ratio could affect these things. In reality, a higher debt ratio will make it harder for you to pay back your debt, so itís important to you. 


How Itís Calculated


You can use an online tool to help you calculate your debt-to-income ratio. You can also use a simple formula if youíre up for doing some math yourself:


Divide your monthly debt payments by your monthly gross income then multiply that number by 100. For example:


Student loans: $400

Car loan: $300

Rent: $700

Income: $4,000 


1400/4000= 0.35 x 100= 35%


Household Ratio


You should also be aware of something called your household ratio. The household is the amount of home-related expenses which includes property taxes, prospective mortgage, home insurance, and more. These costs are divided by your monthly income to get this ratio as well. Obviously, your household debt adds to your financial commitments and is also put into consideration by your lender.    



Whatís A Good Debt-To-Income Ratio?


Itís ideal that you keep your ratio less than 36%. Your household ratio should be even lower than this. Itís great to be debt free, but in the real world, thatís not always possible. Your best bet is to be responsible with your finances and work on paying your debt down as much as you can. Then, little by little all of the critical numbers that are required to get a mortgage will fall into place.  

    






Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 12/3/2017

You have probably been claiming the standard deduction on your taxes up until the time you bought a home. Now that youíre a homeowner, you may want to start itemizing your deductions. Your property investment will help you to start saving money in a new way. There are many different kinds of tax breaks that are available to you. Hereís the breakdown of some of the best deductions:  


Mortgage Interest Deductions


Many times, the biggest tax break comes from deducting mortgage interest. As a homeowner, youíre able to deduct interest on up to $1 million worth of debt that was used to purchase or make improvements to your home. Each January, your lender will send you whatís called a form 1098. This lists the mortgage interest that you paid during the previous year. The form should include the amount of interest that you paid from the date you closed on the home through the end of year. 


Real Estate Tax Deductions


Youíre able to deduct the local property taxes that you pay each year from your April tax forms as well. If you pay your property taxes through an escrow account, youíll receive a statement from your lender. If you happen to pay your taxes directly, however, youíll need to keep good records. You may have also reimbursed the seller for taxes that were paid on the home in the year you purchased it. This can be be included on your real estate tax deduction form. Payments into your escrow account cannot be deducted, as these are just set aside for future tax payments. 


Mortgage Insurance Premiums Can Be Deducted 


If you make a down payment thatís less than 20% of the home purchase price, you may have to pay monthly premiums for mortgage insurance. This is an extra fee that protects the lender if the borrower defaults on the loan. The good news is that these premiums are tax deductible. 


Home Improvement Projects May Be Deductible


You should save your receipts for all of the home improvements that you make throughout the year. This can be anything from windows to landscaping to new energy efficient heating systems. While you may not be able to make these deductions right away, if you make a large profit when you sell your home, the IRS could tax you. Youíll want these deductions available to you if this happens to save money.   


Energy Saving Homes Get Deductions Too 


Any energy saving home improvements that you make can give you an additional tax break. You can earn tax credits worth up to $500. Tax credits are more valuable than deductions since credits actually reduce your tax bill dollar-for-dollar. Other improvements work on a percentage-credit based on the cost of the improvements and the type of project that was done.        




Categories: Real estate   Tax Liens   finances  




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